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 2 of 37 
Orion Telescopes

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Intermediate
Orion SkyView Pro 8" Equatorial Reflector Telescope
$709.99
3 easy payments of $236.66
With payment plan
 
Accepted Payment
In Stock
  • A proverbial light bucket 8" reflector telescope on our stable SkyView Pro equatorial (EQ) mount will provide hour after hour of stargazing fun for the whole family
  • Big 8" parabolic primary mirror and 1000mm focal length (f/4.9) make the SkyView Pro 8 an ideal telescope for viewing deep-space objects such as cloudy nebulas, distant galaxies, and both open and globular star clusters
  • Also capable of breathtaking views of closer cosmic fare like the planets of our solar system and the Moon
  • SkyView Pro equatorial mount with stainless steel tripod provides excellent stability and smooth manual tracking control with the included slow-motion control knobs
  • Includes smooth-adjusting 2" Crayford focuser, two Sirius Plossl 1.25" eyepieces (25mm and 10mm focal lengths), 8x40 finder scope, collimation cap, Starry Night software, and more!


Learn more
Item #  09738

The Orion SkyView Pro 8 Equatorial Reflector Telescope has long been admired for its winning combination of outstanding optics and a rock-solid mount. This is one big telescope, capable of providing big, bright views of cosmic curiosities.

The reflecting telescope features an 8" (203mm) parabolic primary mirror, which gives you a whopping 73% more light grasp than a 6" telescope. More light gathering ability means the Orion SkyView Pro 8 EQ reflector will display brighter, sharper images for both visual study and astrophotographic pursuits.

You'll be delighted with beautiful views of the night sky when using the SkyView Pro 8 Equatorial Reflector Telescope. You can go way beyond the Messier catalog with this telescope! Thanks to its substantial aperture, the 8" SkyView Pro gathers enough light for pleasing views of faint and elusive deep sky objects which you simply cannot detect with smaller diameter instruments. When aimed at the Moon or planets of the solar system, the Orion SkyView Pro 8 Equatorial Reflector Telescope's 1000mm focal length (f/4.9) gives you the ability to resolve fine detail at high power.

Stability for the big 8" aperture reflector is supplied courtesy of the included Orion SkyView Pro Equatorial Mount. Equatorial mounts (commonly called EQ mounts for short) can be aligned with Polaris, the North Star, so that the attached telescope can easily follow celestial objects as they appear to migrate across the night sky using either manual slow-motion controls or an optional electronic motor drive system (motor drive sold separately). If you're interested in using the SkyView Pro 8 for astrophotography, you'll need an optional motor drive or GoTo upgrade kit to capture extended exposures of the night sky.  The stalwart Orion SkyView Pro Equatorial mount and steel tube tripod provide a stable platform that's so smooth you'll think the telescope is floating on air.

The SkyView Pro 8 EQ Reflector telescope features a precise 2" Crayford-style focuser with a 1.25" telescope eyepiece adapter and focus lock knob. Standard accessories that come with the 8" reflector telescope include an 8x40 finder scope, two 1.25" Sirius Plossl telescope eyepieces (25mm and 10mm focal lengths), collimation cap, and a dustcap for the front. The telescope even has a center mark on the 8" primary mirror for easy collimation, or alignment, of the optics. The SkyView Pro Equataorial mount features a handy tripod spreader tray that keeps the tripod stable and can hold accessories like eyepieces when they're not being used.  

This standard, non-computerized configuration of the Orion SkyView Pro 8 Equatorial Reflector Telescope can be upgraded to GoTo capability at any time by purchasing the optional Orion GoTo Upgrade Kit for SkyView Pro EQ Telescope Mounts (sold separately).

Warranty

Limited Warranty against defects in materials or workmanship for one year from date of purchase. This warranty is for the benefit of the original retail purchaser only. For complete warranty details contact us at 800-676-1343.

Warning

Please note this product was not designed or intended by the manufacturer for use by a child 12 years of age or younger.

Product Support
Visit our product support section for instruction manuals and more
  • Best for viewing
    Brighter deep sky
  • Best for imaging
    Deep sky
  • User level
    Intermediate
  • Optical design
    Reflector
  • Optical diameter
    203mm
  • Finder scope lens diameter
    40mm
  • Focal length
    1000mm
  • Focal ratio
    f/4.9
  • Optics type
    Parabolic
  • Glass material
    Soda-lime plate
  • Eyepieces
    Sirius Plossl 25.0mm,10.0mm (1.25")
  • Magnification with included eyepieces
    40x, 100x
  • Resolving power
    0.57arc*sec
  • Lowest useful magnification
    29x
  • Highest useful magnification
    300x
  • Highest theoretical magnification
    406x
  • Limiting stellar magnitude
    14.2
  • Optical quality
    Diffraction limited
  • Finder scope
    8x40
  • Focuser
    2" Crayford
  • Secondary mirror obstruction
    58mm
  • Secondary mirror obstruction by diameter
    29%
  • Secondary mirror obstruction by area
    8%
  • Mirror coatings/over-coatings
    Aluminum & Silicon Dioxide
  • Mount type
    Equatorial
  • Astro-imaging capability
    Lunar, planetary & long exposure
  • Dovetail bar system
    Yes
  • Motor drive compatibility
    Clock drive sold separately
  • Computerized compatibility
    Intelliscope system or Go-To system
  • Bearing material
    Sealed ball bearings
  • Latitude range
    16-64
  • Setting circles
    Yes
  • Polar-axis scope
    Sold separately
  • Counterweights
    Two 7.5 lb.
  • Tube material
    Steel
  • Tripod material
    Steel
  • Tripod leg diameter
    1.75 in.
  • Counterweight bar length
    10 in.
  • Diameter of counterweight shaft
    20mm
  • Height range of mount
    42.25 in. - 55.00 in.
  • Length of optical tube
    38.0 in.
  • Weight, optical tube
    16.5 lbs.
  • Weight, mount/tripod
    25.0 lbs.
  • Weight, fully assembled
    56.5 lbs.
  • Additional included accessories
    Collimation cap
  • Other features
    2" Crayford focuser
  • Warranty
    One year

Orion SkyView Pro 8" f/4.9 reflector telescope optical tube assembly
25mm Orion Sirius Plossl telescope eyepiece
10mm Orion Sirius Plossl telescope eyepiece
Orion 2" - 1.25" eyepiece adapter
Tripod
Orion SkyView Pro equatorial mount
8x40 finder scope
Finder scope bracket with O-ring
Collimation cap
Camera adapter
Tube rings with mounting screws
Tube ring mounting plate
Counterweights
Counterweight shaft
Tripod support tray
Slow-motion control knobs
R.A. axis rear cover
Dust cap
Starry Night Special Edition astronomy software

Orders received by 1pm Eastern Time for in-stock items ship the same business day. Orders received after 1pm will ship the next business day. When an item is not in-stock we will ship it as soon as it becomes available. Typically in-stock items will ship first and backordered items will follow as soon as they are available. You have the option in check out to request that your order ship complete, if you'd prefer.

How can I check the collimation of my reflector?
Collimation is the process of adjusting the telescope’s mirrors so they are perfectly aligned with one another. Your telescope’s optics were aligned at the factory, and should not need much adjustment unless the telescope is handled roughly. Mirror alignment is important to ensure the peak performance of your telescope, so it should be checked regularly. Collimation is relatively easy to do and can be done in daylight. To check collimation, remove the eyepiece and look down the focuser drawtube. You should see the secondary mirror centered in the drawtube, as well as the reflection of the primary mirror centered in the secondary mirror, and the reflection of the secondary mirror (and your eye) centered in the reflection of the primary mirror. If anything is off-center, proceed with the collimation procedure. The faster the f/ratio of your telescope, the more critical the collimation accuracy.

How do I align the secondary mirror with the collimation cap?

With the collimation cap in place, look through the hole in the cap at the secondary mirror. Ignore the reflections for the time being. The secondary mirror itself should be centered in the focuser drawtube, in the direction parallel to the length of the telescope. If it isn’t, it must be adjusted. Typically, this adjustment will rarely, if ever, need to be done. It helps to adjust the secondary mirror in a brightly lit room with the telescope pointed towards a bright surface, such as white paper or wall. Also placing a piece of white paper in the telescope tube opposite the focuser (in other words, on the other side of the secondary mirror) will also be helpful in collimating the secondary mirror. Using a 2mm Allen wrench, loosen the three small alignment set screws in the center hub of the 4-vaned spider several turns. Now hold the mirror holder stationary (be careful not to touch the surface of the mirror), while turning the center screw with a Phillips head screwdriver. Turning the screw clockwise will move the secondary mirror toward the front opening of the optical tube, while turning the screw counter-clockwise will move the secondary mirror toward the primary mirror. Note: When making these adjustments, be careful not to stress the telescope’s spider vanes or they may bend. When the secondary mirror is centered in the focuser draw-tube, rotate the secondary mirror holder until the reflection of the primary mirror is as centered in the secondary mirror as possible. It may not be perfectly centered, but that is OK. Now tighten the three small alignment screws equally to secure the secondary mirror in that position. If the entire primary mirror reflection is not visible in the secondary mirror, you will need to adjust the tilt of the secondary mirror. This is done by alternately loosening one of the three alignment set screws while tightening the other two. The goal is to center the primary mirror reflection in the secondary mirror. Don’t worry that the reflection of the secondary mirror (the smallest circle, with the collimation cap “dot” in the center) is off-center. You will fix that when aligning the primary mirror. Alternative: Some people prefer to remove the primary mirror completely from the telescope when aligning the secondary mirror, especially if the primary mirror needs to be removed anyway to be center-marked. It may help to have no reflections and align the secondary on the edge of the telescope wall.

How do I use the Orion Collimation Cap and the mirror center mark?

The Orion collimation cap is a simple cap that fits on the focuser drawtube like a dust cap, but has a hole in the center and a silver bottom. This helps center your eye so that collimation is easy to perform. Orion telescopes that have a collimation cap included also have a primary mirror that is marked with a circle at its exact center. This “center mark” allows you to achieve a precise collimation of the primary mirror; you don’t have to guess where the center of the mirror is. You simply adjust the mirror position until the reflection of the hole in the collimation cap is centered in the ring. The center mark is also required for best results when using other collimating devices, such as Orion’s LaserMate Collimator, obviating the need to remove the primary mirror and mark it yourself. Note: The center ring sticker need not ever be removed from the primary mirror. Because it lies directly in the shadow of the secondary mirror, its presence in no way adversely affects the optical performance of the telescope or the image quality. That might seem counterintuitive, but its true!

How do I align the primary mirror with the collimation cap and center-marked mirror?

The telescope’s primary mirror will need adjustment if the secondary mirror is centered under the focuser and the reflection of the primary mirror is centered in the secondary mirror, but the small reflection of the secondary mirror (with the “dot” of the collimation cap) is off-center. The tilt of the primary mirror is adjusted with the larger collimation screws on the back end of the telescope’s optical tube. The other smaller screws lock the mirror’s position in place; these thumbscrews must be loosened before any collimation adjustments can be made to the primary mirror. To start, loosen the smaller thumbscrews that lock the primary mirror in place a few turns each. Use a screwdriver in the slots, if necessary. Now, try tightening or loosening one of the larger collimation screws with your fingers Look into the focuser and see if the secondary mirror reflection has moved closer to the center of the primary. You can tell this easily with the collimation cap and mirror center mark by simply watching to see if the “dot” of the collimation cap is moving closer or further away from the “ring” on the center of the primary mirror mark. When you have the dot centered as much as is possible in the ring, your primary mirror is collimated. Re-tighten the locking thumbscrews. Alternative: If you loosen one or more of the bolts too much, it won’t move the mirror. Some people prefer to pre-load the collimation screws by tightening them all down and adjust by loosening each one in turn. This way you don’t run-out of threads and have a loose collimation screw. The disadvantage to this approach is that you have completely un-collimated the scope and are starting from the beginning.

Is the LaserMate Collimator dangerous?
The LaserMate emits laser radiation, so it is important not to shine the beam into your or anyone’s eye. During the collimation procedure, it is also important to avoid direct reflections of the laser beam into your eye. Rather, look only at off-axis reflections to determine the position of the laser spot on the mirrors. It is safe to view the laser when it is reflected off a surface that will diffuse the light, such as the bottom surface of the LaserMate. It is also safe to view the reflection off a mirror surface as long as the beam is not directed into your eye. Because of the potential danger from the laser beam, store your LaserMate out of the reach of children.

How do I align a polar finder?

This procedure is complicated and it is not required for casual observing, but here it goes . . .

Remove the cover cap from the front opening in the R.A. axis of the telescope mount. Look through the polar finder at a distant object. Focus the polar finder so that the images and reticle are sharp by rotating the eyepiece end of the finder. Notice that the reticle pattern consists of a crosshair with a circle around the middle. On the circumference of this circle is a tiny circle; this is where Polaris will be placed for accurate polar alignment once the finder is properly aligned. Alignment of the polar finder is best done during the day, before going out into the field at night. Aligning the polar axis finder scope so that it will accurately point at the true north pole is a two-step procedure. First, the polar finder must be rotated in its housing so that the small circle in which Polaris will be placed in is in the proper initial position. Next, the polar axis finder must be adjusted so that it points directly along the mount’s R.A. axis.:

  • 1. Loosen the R.A. setting circle lock thumb screw, located just above the R.A. setting circle. Rotate the R.A. setting circle until the line above the “0” on the setting circle lines up with the pointed indicator that is cast into the mount. Retighten the thumbscrew.
  •  2. Rotate the date circle until the “0” line on the meridian off-set scale lines up with the time meridian indicator mark. The meridian offset scale is printed on the inner circumference of the date circle, and is labeled “E20” to “W20”. The time meridian indicator mark is an engraved line on the exterior of the polar finder’s housing. It is on the “ring” of the housing that is closest to the date circle.
  •  3. The R.A. setting circle is labeled in hours, from “0” to “23” (military time). For Northern Hemisphere observers, refer to the top numbers on the setting circle. Each small line represents 10 minutes of R.A. The date circle is labeled from “1” to “12”, with each number representing a month of the year (“1” is January, “2” is February, etc.). Each small line represents a two-day increment.
  •  4. Loosen the R.A. lock lever and rotate the mount about the R.A. axis until the March 1 indicating mark (the long line between the “2” and the “3”) on the date circle lines up with the 4 PM mark (the long line above the “16”) on the R.A. setting circle. You may find it convenient to remove both the counterweights and the telescope optical tube to do this.
  • 5. Now, loosen the three thumbscrews on the polar finder housing and rotate the polar finder so the small circle where Polaris will be centered is located straight down from the intersection of the crosshairs. Retighten the thumbscrews. The polar axis finder scope is now properly set in its initial position. Next, you must align it so that it is exactly parallel to the mount’s R.A. axis.
  • 6. Look through the polar finder at a distant object (during the day) and center it in the crosshairs. You may need to adjust the latitude adjustment T-bolts and the tripod position to do this.
  • 7. Rotate the mount 180-deg about the R.A. axis. Again, it may be convenient to remove the counterweights and optical tube first.
  • 8. Look through the polar finder again. Is the object being viewed still centered on the crosshairs? If it is, then no further adjustment is necessary. If not, then look through the polar finder while rotating the mount about the R.A. axis. You will notice that the object you have previously centered moves in a circular path. Use the three thumbscrews on the housing to redirect the crosshairs of the polar finder to the apparent center of this circular path. Repeat this procedure until the position that the crosshairs point to does not rotate off-center when the mount is rotated in R.A. Once this is accomplished, retighten the thumbscrews. The polar axis finder scope is now ready to be used. When not in use, replace the plastic protective cover to prevent the polar finder from getting bumped, which could knock it out of alignment.

How do I align a finder scope?

Before you use the finder scope, it must be precisely aligned with the telescope so they both point to exactly the same spot. Alignment is easiest to do in daylight, rather than at night under the stars. First, insert a low power telescope eyepiece (a 25mm eyepiece will work great) into the telescope’s focuser. Then point the telescope at a discrete object such as the top of a telephone pole or a street sign that is at least a quarter-mile away. Position the telescope so the target object appears in the very center of the field of view when you look into the eyepiece. Now look through the finder scope. Is the object centered on the finder scope’s crosshairs? If not, hopefully it will be visible somewhere in the field of view, so only small turns of the finder scope bracket’s alignment thumb screws will be needed. Otherwise you’ll have to make larger turns to the alignment thumb screws to redirect the aim of the finder scope. Use the alignment thumb screws to center the object on the crosshairs of the finder scope. Then look again into the telescope’s eyepiece and see if it is still centered there too. If it isn’t, repeat the entire process, making sure not to move the telescope while adjusting the alignment of the finder scope. Finder scopes can come out of alignment during transport or when removed from the telescope, so check its alignment before each observing session.

How do I focus the finder scope?
If, when looking through the finder scope, you notice that the image is fuzzy, you will need to focus the finder scope for your eyes. Different finder scopes focus differently; most Orion finder scopes include a lock ring near the objective and focus as follows:
1. Loosen the lock ring that is located behind the finder’s objective lens cell
2. Screw the objective lens cell in or out until the image appears sharp.
3. Tighten the lock ring behind the lens cell. If there is no lock ring the finder scope is focused by rotating the eyepiece.
Once the finder scope is now focused it should not need focusing again for your eyes..

Can the finder scope crosshairs be adjusted?

Yes, but before taking this on, regardless of the orientation, the intersection of the crosshairs marks the center and that’s what important. However, should you feel the need to change the orientation of the finder scope’s crosshairs; you can do so by carefully rotating the finder scope in its bracket. Loosen the adjustment screws or pull on the tensioner (depending on the model) and rotate the finder scope tube in the bracket until the crosshairs are oriented the way you want. You should not need to rotate the finder scope tube more than 1/4 of a turn. .

For right-angle finder scopes, unthread the eyepiece to re-orient the crosshairs; gently turn the eyepiece until the crosshairs are oriented as you wish. You should not need to rotate the eyepiece more than 1/4 of a turn to do this. This may leave you with a loose eyepiece. If so, you can add an o-ring or shim to tighten it at the new orientation.

How do I calculate the magnification (power) of a telescope?

To calculate the magnification, or power, of a telescope with an eyepiece, simply divide the focal length of the telescope by the focal length of the eyepiece. Magnification = telescope focal length ÷ eyepiece focal length. For example, the Orion SkyView Pro 8" Reflecting Telescope, which has a focal length of 1000mm, used in combination with the supplied 25mm eyepiece, yields a power of: 1000 ÷ 25 = 40x.

It is desirable to have a range of telescope eyepieces of different focal lengths to allow viewing over a range of magnifications. It is not uncommon for an observer to own five or more eyepieces. Orion offers many different eyepieces of varying focal lengths.

Every telescope has a theoretical limit of power of about 50x per inch of aperture (i.e. 400x for the Orion Skyquest XX14i). Atmospheric conditions will limit the usefullness of magnification and cause views to become blurred. The highest useful magnification of a telescope of the Orion SkyView Pro 8" Reflector is 300x. Claims of higher power by some telescope manufacturers are a misleading advertising gimmick and should be dismissed. Keep in mind that at higher powers, an image will always be dimmer and less sharp (this is a fundamental law of optics). With every doubling of magnification you lose half the image brightness and three-fourths of the image sharpness. The steadiness of the air (the “seeing”) can also limit how much magnification an image can tolerate. Always start viewing with your lowest-power (longest focal length) eyepiece in the telescope. It’s best to begin observing with the lowest-power eyepiece, because it will typically provide the widest true field of view, which will make finding and centering objects much easier After you have located and centered an object, you can try switching to a higher-power eyepiece to ferret out more detail, if atmospheric conditions permit. If the image you see is not crisp and steady, reduce the magnification by switching to a longer focal length eyepiece. As a general rule, a small but well-resolved image will show more detail and provide a more enjoyable view than a dim and fuzzy, over-magnified image.

What are practical focal lengths to have for eyepieces for my telescope?

To determine what telescope eyepieces you need to get powers in a particular range with your telescope, see our Learning Center article: How to choose Telescope Eyepieces

Why do Orion telescopes have less power than the telescope at department stores?

Advertising claims for high magnification of 400X, 600X, etc., are very misleading. The practical limit is 50X per inch of aperture, or 120X for a typical 60mm telescope. Higher powers are useless, and serve only to fool the unwary into thinking that magnification is somehow related to quality of performance. It is not.

How big a telescope do I need?
For viewing craters on the Moon, the rings of Saturn, and Jupiter with its four bright moons, a 60mm or 70mm refractor or a 3-inch reflector telescope does a good job. An 80mm to 90mm refractor or 4.5-inch or 6-inch reflector will show more planetary and lunar detail as well as glowing nebulas and sparkling star clusters. Under dark, non-light-polluted skies, a big scope—8-inch diameter or more—will serve up magnificent images of fainter clusters, galaxies, and nebulas. The larger the telescope, the more detail you will see. But don’t bite off more than you can chew, size-wise. Before you buy, consider carefully a telescope’s size and weight. Make sure you can comfortably lift and transport it, and that you have room indoors to store it. For more detailed information on this topic see our Learning Center article: Choosing a Telescope for Astronomy - The long Version

Does the atmosphere play a role in how good the quality of the image will be?
Atmospheric conditions play a huge part in quality of viewing. In conditions of good “seeing”, star twinkling is minimal and objects appear steady in the eyepiece. Seeing is best over-head, worst at the horizon. Also, seeing generally gets better after midnight, when much of the heat absorbed by the Earth during the day has radiated off into space. Typically, seeing conditions will be better at sites that have an altitude over about 3000 feet. Altitude helps because it decreases the amount of distortion causing atmosphere you are looking through. A good way to judge if the seeing is good or not is to look at bright stars about 40 degrees above the horizon. If the stars appear to “twinkle”, the atmosphere is significantly distorting the incoming light, and views at high magnifications will not appear sharp. If the stars appear steady and do not twinkle, seeing conditions are probably good and higher magnifications will be possible. Also, seeing conditions are typically poor during the day. This is because the heat from the Sun warms the air and causes turbulence. Good “transparency” is especially important for observing faint objects. It simply means the air is free of moisture, smoke, and dust. These tend to scatter light, which reduces an object’s brightness. One good way to tell if conditions are good is by how many stars you can see with your naked eye. If you cannot see stars of magnitude 3.5 or dimmer then conditions are poor. Magnitude is a measure of how bright a star is, the brighter a star is, the lower its magnitude will be. A good star to remember for this is Megrez (mag. 3.4), which is the star in the “Big Dipper” connecting the handle to the “dipper”. If you cannot see Megrez, then you have fog, haze, clouds, smog, light pollution or other conditions that are hindering your viewing. Another hint: Good seeing can vary minute to minute. Watch the planets for a while to pick-up those moments of good seeing.

How long will it take my eyes to dark adapt?
Do not expect to go from a lighted house into the darkness of the outdoors at night and immediately see faint nebulas, galaxies, and star clusters—or even very many stars, for that matter. Your eyes take about 30 minutes to reach perhaps 80 percent of their full dark-adapted sensitivity. Many observers notice improvements after several hours of total darkness. As your eyes become dark-adapted, more stars will glimmer into view and you will be able to see fainter details in objects you view in your telescope. So give yourself at least a little while to get used to the dark before you begin observing. To see what you are doing in the darkness, use a red light flashlight rather than a white light. Red light does not spoil your eyes’ dark adaptation like white light does. A flashlight with a red LED light is ideal, or you can cover the front of a regular flashlight with red cellophane or paper. Beware, too, that nearby porch and streetlights and automobile headlights will spoil your night vision. Your eyes can take at least 1/2 hour to re-adjust.

Is there an eyepiece available that will rotate the image so that it can be used for scenic viewing?

Orion carries correct-image prism diagonals which provide right-side up non-reversed images in refractor and cassegrain telescopes. It is not possible to correct the image orientation in a reflector telescope.

How do I clean the reflecting mirror of my telescope?
You should not have to clean the telescope’s mirrors very often; normally once every other year or even less often. Covering the telescope with the dust cover when it is not in use will prevent dust from accumulating on the mirrors. Improper cleaning can scratch mirror coatings, so the fewer times you have to clean the mirrors, the better. Small specks of dust or flecks of paint have virtually no effect on the visual performance of the telescope. The large primary mirror and the elliptical secondary mirror of your telescope are front-surface aluminized and over-coated with hard silicon dioxide, which prevents the aluminum from oxidizing. These coatings normally last through many years of use before requiring re-coating. To clean the secondary mirror, first remove it from the telescope. Do this by holding the secondary mirror holder stationary while turning the center Phillips-head screw. Be careful, there is a spring between the secondary mirror holder and the phillips head screw. Be sure that it will not fall into the optical tube and hit the primary mirror. Handle the mirror by its holder; do not touch the mirror surface. Then follow the same procedure described below for cleaning the primary mirror. To clean the primary mirror, carefully remove the mirror cell from the telescope and remove the mirror from the mirror cell. If you have an Orion telescope, instructions to remove the primary mirror are included in your instruction manual. Do not touch the surface of the mirror with your fingers. Lift the mirror carefully by the edges. Set the mirror on top, face up, of a clean soft towel. Fill a clean sink, free of abrasive cleanser, with room-temperature water, a few drops of mild liquid dishwashing soap, and, if possible, a capful of rubbing alcohol. Submerge the mirror (aluminized face up) in the water and let it soak for a few minutes (or hours if it’s a very dirty mirror). Wipe the mirror under water with clean cotton balls, using extremely light pressure and stroking in straight line across the mirror. Use one ball for each wipe across the mirror. Then rinse the mirror under a stream of lukewarm water. Before drying, tip the mirror to a 45 degree angle and pour a bottle of distilled water over the mirror. This will prevent any tap water dissolved solids from remaining on the mirror. Any particles on the surface can be swabbed gently with a series of cotton balls, each used just one time. Dry the mirror in a stream of air (a “blower bulb” works great), or remove any stray drops of water with the corner of a paper towel. Water will run off a clean surface. Cover the mirror surface with tissue, and leave the mirror in a warm area until it is completely dry before replacing in the mirror cell and telescope.

Does my telescope require time to cool down?
As a general rule, telescopes should be allowed to cool down (or warm up) before they are used. If you bring optics from a warm air to cold air (or vice versa) without giving it time to reach thermal equilibrium, your telescope will give you distorted views. Allow your telescope 30 minutes to an hour to reach the temperature of the outdoors before using. When brining your telescope from cool temperatures to warm temperatures, leave any protective caps off until the telescope has warmed-up to prevent condensation. Storing your telescope in the garage or shed where the temperature is closer to the outside temperature will reduce cool down times.

How do I Polar Align an Equatorial Mount?
For Northern Hemisphere observers, approximate polar alignment is achieved by pointing the mount’s R.A. axis at the North Star, or Polaris. It lies within 1° of the north celestial pole (NCP), which is an extension of the Earth’s rotational axis out into space. Stars in the Northern Hemisphere appear to revolve around Polaris..

To find Polaris in the sky, look north and locate the pattern of the Big Dipper. The two stars at the end of the “bowl” of the Big Dipper point right to Polaris. Observers in the Southern Hemisphere aren’t so fortunate to have a bright star so near the south celestial pole (SCP). The star Sigma Octantis lies about 1° from the SCP, but it is barely visible with the naked eye (magnitude 5.5)..

For general visual observation, an approximate polar alignment is sufficient: 1. Level the equatorial mount by adjusting the length of the three tripod legs.
2. Loosen one of the latitude adjusting T-bolts and tighten the other to tilt the mount until the pointer on the latitude scale is set at the latitude of your observing site. This may vary depending on the mount, some have one bolt and a tightening screw instead. If you don’t know your latitude, consult a geographical atlas to find it. For example, if your latitude is 35° North, set the pointer to +35. The latitude setting should not have to be adjusted again unless you move to a different viewing location some distance away.
3. Loosen the Dec. lock lever and rotate the telescope optical tube until it is parallel with the R.A. axis. The pointer on the Dec. setting circle should read 90-deg. Retighten the Dec. lock lever.
4. Move the tripod so the telescope tube (and R.A. axis) points roughly at Polaris. If you cannot see Polaris directly from your observing site, consult a compass and rotate the tripod so the telescope points north. Using a compass is a less desirable option, a compass points about 16° away from true north and requires you to compensate foe accurate polar alignment.

The equatorial mount is now approximately polar-aligned for casual observing. More precise polar alignment is required for astrophotography and for use of the manual setting circles. From this point on in your observing session, you should not make any further adjustments to the latitude of the mount, nor should you move the tripod. Doing so will undo the polar alignment. The telescope should be moved only about its R.A. and Dec. axes.

What are the Setting Circles and how do I use them?

The setting circles on an equatorial mount enable you to locate celestial objects by their “celestial coordinates”. Every object resides in a specific location on the “celestial sphere”. That location is denoted by two numbers: its right ascension (R.A.) and declination (Dec.). In the same way, every location on Earth can be described by its longitude and latitude. R.A. is similar to longitude on Earth, and Dec. is similar to latitude. The R.A. and Dec. values for celestial objects can be found in any star atlas or star catalog. The R.A. setting circle is scaled in hours, from 1 through 24, with small marks in between representing 10 minute increments (there are 60 minutes in 1 hour of R.A.). The upper set of numbers apply to viewing in the Northern Hemisphere, while the numbers below them apply to viewing in the Southern Hemisphere. The Dec. setting circle is scaled in degrees, with each mark representing 2° increments. Values of Dec. coordinates range from +90° to -90°. The 0° mark indicates the celestial equator. When the telescope is pointed north of the celestial equator, values of the Dec. setting circle are positive, while when the telescope is pointed south of the celestial equator, values of the Dec. setting circle are negative. So, the coordinates for the Orion Nebula listed in a star atlas will look like this: R.A. 5h 35.4m Dec. -5-deg 27’ That’s 5 hours and 35.4 minutes in right ascension, and -5 degrees and 27 arc-minutes in declination (there are 60 arc-minutes in 1 degree of declination). Before you can use the setting circles to locate objects, the mount must be well polar aligned, and the R.A. setting circle must be calibrated. The Dec. setting circle has been calibrated at the factory, and should read 90-deg whenever the telescope optical tube is parallel with the R.A. axis. Click here for information on calibrating the RA Axis.

How do I find objects with the setting circles?
Look up in a star atlas the coordinates of an object you wish to view.

1. Loosen the Dec. lock lever and rotate the telescope until the Dec. value from the star atlas matches the reading on the Dec. setting circle. Remember that values of the Dec. setting circle are positive when the telescope is pointing north of the celestial equator (Dec. = 0°), and negative when the telescope is pointing south of the celestial equator. Retighten the lock lever.
2. Loosen the R.A. lock lever and rotate the telescope until the R.A. value from the star atlas matches the reading on the R.A. setting circle. Remember to use the upper set of numbers on the R.A. setting circle. Retighten the lock lever. The lower set is for the Southern Hemisphere.

Most setting circles are not accurate enough to put an object dead-center in the telescope’s eyepiece, but they should place the object somewhere within the field of view of the finder scope, assuming the equatorial mount is accurately polar aligned. Use the slow-motion controls to center the object in the finder scope, and it should appear in the telescope’s field of view. The R.A. setting circle must be re-calibrated every time you wish to locate a new object. Do so by calibrating the setting circle for the centered object before moving on to the next one.

Why aren’t objects any brighter using a light pollution filter?
These filters improve contrast between sky and object but will not actually make the object brighter. Expect a very dark sky background and a somewhat dimmer but high-contrast image. Our SkyGlow and UltraBlock filters improve the contrast of most objects by increasing the blackness of the night sky. The UltraBlock Narrowband filter will have a negative affect on viewing galaxies and stars; the coatings on the filters are specifically formulated for emission-type objects like nebula. Remember to use low power and longer focal-length eyepieces. Also allow your eyes to dark-adapt is the key to getting the most from these filters. Allow your eyes to dark-adapt for about 20-30 minutes before you use the filter. Once the pupil in your eye opens up, you’ll be able to take full advantage of the benefits of these filters.

I recently purchased a solar filter for my telescope and can’t see anything with it. Any suggestions?

One of the problems with a solar filter on a telescope is that it’s a bit tricky to aim it at the sun. You can’t look through the finder to point the scope or you’ll cause injury to your eye. So, cap off or remove the finder. Also, because with the very dark filter on the front if the sun is slightly outside the field of view of the eyepiece you’ll see pitch blackness in the field. With the solar filter properly mounted, try looking at the shadow of the optical tube on the ground, move the tube until the shadow is at a minimum. You’ll be pointed at the sun, or at least close enough to find it with a little sweeping and a low-power eyepiece to bring it into view. It can be difficult, even with the shadow method. An other trick to try after you’ve got it close with the shadow if your still not having any luck getting the sun in the field...take the eyepiece out of the focuser. Then look into the focuser...you won’t see an image but when the sun gets close you’ll see a flicker of brightness coming through the mirrors. Then pop the eyepiece back in and you should have it.

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